United Nations (UN) Draft Resolution On The Right To Privacy In The Digital Age

United Nations (UN) Draft Resolution On The Right To Privacy In The Digital AgeHuman Rights Protection in Cyberspace or Civil Liberties Protection in Cyberspace is essential part of Civil Liberty Environment of the present times. Although protection of Human Rights in the traditional world is the responsibility of United Nations yet when it comes to cyberspace, UN has been slow in this regard.

This is the reason why many have urged that United Nations must protect Human rights in cyberspace. The seriousness of UN to protect Human Rights in cyberspace has also been questioned in the past. The UN finally broke its silence in this regard and declared that access to Internet is a human right. However, this did not prevent e-surveillance by various governments and its agencies through out the world.

To challenge this situation, Germany and Brazil drafted the resolution to regulate a control over excessive electronic surveillance by various intelligence agencies around the world. The original United Nations (UN) Draft Resolution on the Right to Privacy in the Digital Age (PDF) is a landmark resolution that has to be considered by the United Nations (UN) very soon.

The U.N. General Assembly’s Third Committee, which deals with human rights issues, is to vote on the draft next week, and it is then expected to be put to a vote by the 193-nation General Assembly in December.

The initial draft would have had the assembly declare it is “deeply concerned at human rights violations and abuses that may result from the conduct of any surveillance of communications, including extraterritorial surveillance of communications.”

But the language has been changed to “deeply concerned at the negative impact that surveillance and/or interception of communications, including extraterritorial surveillance and/or interception of communications, as well as the collection of personal data, in particular when carried out on a mass scale, may have on the exercise and enjoyment of human rights.”

A senior U.N. diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity, described the new language as a compromise that “sort of breaks the link between extraterritorial surveillance and human rights violations.”

At Perry4Law and Perry4Law’s Techno Legal Base (PTLB) we believe that UN must play a more pro active role for protection of Human Rights in Cyberspace. Any dilution of the Human Rights Protection in Cyberspace must be seriously frowned by the UN.